VB2019 preview: Inside Magecart: the history behind the covert card-skimming assault on the e-commerce industry

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Aug 30, 2019

Half a decade ago, breaches of point-of-sale (POS) systems were a real plague, especially in North America, with the 2013 Target breach perhaps the best known example.

Though credit card theft through POS hacks hasn't completely disappeared, today's skimmers largely act online, using JavaScript to insert skimmers into websites' payment pages.

The more than a dozen different groups behind these breaches are referred to by the umbrella term 'Magecart', a name first used by RiskIQ and made popular through a 2016 joint report by RiskIQ and Flashpoint. Different groups use different tactics, from targeted attacks against big websites to automatically scanning for known CMS vulnerabilities, to compromising third-party JavaScript code loaded on such websites.

ecosystem_image1.pngA rich underground economy exists around all the different steps needed to monetize a breach.

At VB2019 in London, RiskIQ researcher Yonathan Klijnsma will present a paper on Magecart, in which he discusses the history of web skimmers and profiles six Magecart groups to provide a good overview of the different modi operandi of the various groups.

Don't forget to book your ticket for VB2019 to see Yonathan and dozens of other speakers discuss the latest trends in threat intelligence. And if you are quick, the call for last-minute papers for the conference remains open for submissions until the end of this weekend!

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