VB2017 paper: Android reverse engineering tools: not the usual suspects

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Apr 18, 2018

Within a few years, Android malware has grown from a relatively small threat – the first VB conference talk on Android, in 2011, mentioned fewer than 100 malware families – to a huge problem involving more than three million new malware samples a year.

The subject has been a regular one on the VB conference programme, and this year's programme is no exception: Google's Maddie Stone will take the audience through reverse-engineering an Android anti-analysis library, while Sophos researcher Rowland Yu will discuss how to perform network analysis on Android devices. There is also a reserve paper from Check Point researchers Yoni Moses and Yaniv Mordekhay on combining static and dynamic analysis to deobfuscate Android apps.

For those who are interested in digging a bit deeper into reverse engineering Android malware, there is a workshop entitled 'Android malware reverse engineering for the brave', which will be run by Fortinet's 'Crypto Girl' Axelle Apvrille, one of the world's leading Android malware researchers and a regular VB conference speaker.

At VB2016, Axelle spoke about how an accompanying mobile app could be a useful 'backdoor' for researching an internet-of-things device, while last year she presented a paper on less common tools for Android reverse engineering. Today, we publish this paper in both HTML and PDF format. We have also uploaded the video of Axelle's presentation to our YouTube channel.

Registration for VB2018 will open soon.

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