Five reasons to submit a VB2018 paper this weekend

Posted by   Martijn Grooten on   Mar 16, 2018

The call for papers for VB2018 will close this Sunday, 18 March (in fact, to ensure we cover the entirety of the deadline day across all time zones, we'll close submissions first thing on Monday morning, European time). We've already received many great submissions, but more are always welcome.

27-IMG_0414.jpgThe VB2017 speakers all look like they were having fun - so why not give it a go yourself and submit a proposal for VB2018?


Here are five reasons why you should submit a paper this weekend:

  1. Let others decide whether your research is worth hearing about. In the past I have spoken to several people who weren't sure if what they had been working on was interesting enough for the VB audience. Being critical of your own work can be a good thing, but this is why we have a selection committee (which includes some of the industry's top experts): let us decide whether it is interesting. (Indeed, in the majority of cases, the people I had spoken to really did have something interesting to present!)

  2. VB attracts a friendly and very international audience. VB is neither an overwhelmingly large event, nor confined to a local audience. By presenting your work at VB2018, you can ensure that it will be heard by industry peers from around the world, while allowing ample opportunity to discuss your work with the audience after your talk.

  3. Part of speaking at the conference includes writing a paper. This gives you the opportunity to add some extra details that you can't fit into your 30-minute talk. It will also create a more permanent record of your research (indeed, VB conference papers from years and even decades ago are often still referenced). VB will edit all papers and will be happy to help with the writing of the paper where needed. (Note: while we intend to make all papers and videos available to the public after the conference, we won't do so without the explicit permission of the speaker/author. We understand that not all papers are suitable to be made publicly available.)

  4. The conference takes place in Montreal. In the largest city of the Canadian province of Quebec, people switch as easily between French and English as you switch between assembly and C++, or between Fancy Bear and the Lazarus Group. Speaking at VB will give you an opportunity to visit this fascinating city.

  5. You really only have this weekend. VB has, over the years, built up a reputation for being strict on timing: conference talks start and end on time, and in parallel where appropriate, thus making it easier to plan and meaning there is no need to leave one talk early because you want to go and see another one in a different room. We apply the same rule to the calls for papers: the deadlines are strict. (Note: for very hot topics and up-to-the-minute research (only), there will be a call for 'last-minute' papers in the summer.)

Don't forget that we are looking for non-technical papers as well as technical ones, that we welcome first-time speakers as much as experienced ones, and that we are happy for you to contact us if you have any questions.

So, you have until Sunday 18 March to submit a paper – what are you waiting for?

VB2018-withdate-325w.jpg

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